Invention of the cell phone essay

1866 -- The Leclanché carbon-zinc battery
The first cell developed by Georges Leclanché in France was a wet cell having its electrodes immersed in a liquid. Nevertheless, it was rugged and easy to manufacture and had a good shelf life. He later improved the battery by substituting a moist ammonium chloride paste for the liquid electrolyte and sealing the battery. The resulting battery was referred to as a dry cell . It could be used in various positions and moved about without spilling. Carbon-zinc dry cells are sold to this day in blister packages labeled "heavy duty" and "transistor power". The anode of the cell was zinc, which was made into a cup or can which contained the other parts of the battery. The cathode was a mixture of 8 parts manganese dioxide with one part of carbon black, connected to the positive post or button at the top of the battery by a carbon collector rod. The electrolyte paste may also contain some zinc chloride. Around 1960 sales of Leclanché cells were surpassed by the newer alkaline-manganese batteries.

Invention of the cell phone essay

invention of the cell phone essay

Media:

invention of the cell phone essayinvention of the cell phone essayinvention of the cell phone essayinvention of the cell phone essay