Essay on arianism

Whether the close overlay between the architectonic of secularist progressivism and Judeo-Christianity itself speaks to the inescapabilty of two thousand years of religious history, or rather to the resonance of those religious traditions themselves with the deepest and most ineradicable human longings for transcendence — or both — is a fascinating subject that deserves to be explored. But that today’s progressive ideology shares recognizable features with Judeo-Christianity, even as it repudiates all traditionalist tenets that threaten its substitute theology, seems beyond dispute.

H ere Jesus is often seen as a Guru or teacher. Much speculation centres around Jesus 'lost' years between 12 and 30, which are not discussed in the Gospels. Some Hindus take the view that Jesus spent time in India, learning yogic traditions before returning home. A group of Buddhists, on the other hand believe Jesus spent time in Tibet learning Buddhist teaching amongst the monks there. The teachings of Jesus had significant impact on the thought of Mahatma Gandhi and remain influential amongst Hindus and Buddhists to this day.

There was a moment in the earthly life of Christ when the crowds had all abandoned Him, and He was left with His band of disciples. He asked them if they were going to leave too. Peter spoke up for the group: “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life, and we have believed, and have come to know, that you are the Holy One of God” (John 6:68–69). Sometime later, one of the Twelve had his doubts. Jesus had been crucified and buried. There was testimony of His resurrection, but Thomas doubted. Then Jesus appeared to Thomas. He touched the wounds of Christ, the wounds He endured for our sins. Thomas confessed, “My Lord and my God!” (John 20:28).

“ In the gospels of the Christian New Tetament, One of Matthew 's plotlines is the three visitors from the East who visit the newborn Jesus ( Matthew 1:1-23 ). They say that a star came up in the East and that they followed it to Jesus's birthplace. The story is not contained in any of the other gospels. There were a number of early astronomers of that era who meticulously recorded star movements, especially any unusual ones. Although they record many other events, none of them record the one described by Matthew 21 , 22 ; and the other elements in the story were noticed by anyone else either - despite the fact that a gift of gold would have been a momentous community-changing event. It is clear that the events described did not actually happen - so where does the story come from?

Essay on arianism

essay on arianism

“ In the gospels of the Christian New Tetament, One of Matthew 's plotlines is the three visitors from the East who visit the newborn Jesus ( Matthew 1:1-23 ). They say that a star came up in the East and that they followed it to Jesus's birthplace. The story is not contained in any of the other gospels. There were a number of early astronomers of that era who meticulously recorded star movements, especially any unusual ones. Although they record many other events, none of them record the one described by Matthew 21 , 22 ; and the other elements in the story were noticed by anyone else either - despite the fact that a gift of gold would have been a momentous community-changing event. It is clear that the events described did not actually happen - so where does the story come from?

Media:

essay on arianismessay on arianismessay on arianismessay on arianism