Critical essay on a novel

Briefly state your position, state why the problem you are working on is important, and indicate the important questions that need to be answered; this is your "Introduction." Push quickly through this draft--don't worry about spelling, don't search for exactly the right word, don't hassle yourself with grammar, don't worry overmuch about sequence--that's why this is called a "rough draft." Deal with these during your revisions. The point of a rough draft is to get your ideas on paper. Once they are there, you can deal with the superficial (though very important) problems.

I’ve taught it as a read aloud for 5th grade, three years running. I taught a one month Social Studies unit on the history of African Americans in the US and another mini unit on the Great Depression to give the students background knowledge of the Jim Crow South during the Depression. I have seen students who hate reading become “converted” to the world of great literature. I explain to the students that, while the main characters are children, it’s not a children’s book. I also explain that there is a difference between the books that they have read up to that point and Pulitzer Prize winning books. I teach it to children in the 5th grade knowing that they will probably read it again in Junior High or High School. I want them to have a good relationship with the book before it becomes a tedious task.

Critical essay on a novel

critical essay on a novel

Media:

critical essay on a novelcritical essay on a novelcritical essay on a novelcritical essay on a novel