1919 black sox scandal essay

The great Chicago White Sox team of 1919 is the saddest team to ever win a pennant. The team is bitter at their penny pincher owner, Charles Comiskey, and at their own teammates. Gamblers take advantage of this opportunity to offer some players money to throw the series. (Most of the players didn't get as much as promised.) But Buck Weaver and the great Shoeless Joe Jackson turn back at the last minute and try to play their best. The Sox actually almost come back from a 3-1 deficit. Two years later, the truth breaks out and the Sox are sued on multiple counts. They are found innocent by the jury but baseball commissioner Landis has other plans. The eight players are suspended for life, and Buck Weaver, for the rest of his life, tries to clear his name. Written by Patrick Lynn <pjustinl@>

Although many believe the Black Sox name to be related to the dark and corrupt nature of the conspiracy, the term "Black Sox" may already have existed before the fix. There is a story that the name "Black Sox" derived from parsimonious owner Charles Comiskey 's refusal to pay for the players' uniforms to be laundered, instead insisting that the players themselves pay for the cleaning. As the story goes, the players refused and subsequent games saw the White Sox play in progressively filthier uniforms as dust, sweat and grime collected on the white, woolen uniforms until they took on a much darker shade. Comiskey then had the uniforms washed and deducted the laundry bill from the players' salaries. [23]

The odd thing – or perhaps not – about the legal battle surrounding the World Series fix is that “[a]ll the records and minutes of the Grand Jury disappeared.  So, too, did the signed confessions of Cicotte, Williams and Jackson… The state, virtually all of its evidence gone, sought to get the players to repeat their confession on the stand.  This they refused to do, citing the Fifth Amendment.” Eventually, the judge had no choice but to dismiss the case.  Katcher states, “Thus, on the official record and on the basis of [State Attorney Maclay] Hoyne’s statement, Rothstein was never involved in in the fixing of the Series.  Also, on the official record, it was never proved that the Series had been fixed.”  All eight White Sox playerss were forever banned from the game of baseball.  Despite all his denials, though, Katcher notes that “while Rothstein won the Series, he won a small sum.  He always maintained it was less than $100,000.  It actually was about $350,000.  It could have been much – very much – more.  It wasn’t because Rothstein chicken out.  A World Series fix was too good to be true – even if it was true.”

1919 black sox scandal essay

1919 black sox scandal essay

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